Malaga. Birthplace of Picasso and the southern most large city in Europe
01 Feb

Malaga. Birthplace of Picasso and the southern most large city in Europe

The southernmost large city in Europe. One of the oldest cities in the world (2.800 years). The birthplace of Picasso. As many ways to briefly introduce Malaga, from a long list of qualities that make this quick-thriving city get under your skin in unexpected ways.  Two massive hilltop citadels solemnly loom over the city’s skyline – the Alcazaba (dating back to the 700s!) and ruined Gibralfaro, remnants of Moorish rule – along with a soaring Renaissance cathedral, nicknamed La Manquita (“one-armed woman”) because one of its towers was curiously left unbuilt. Its modern port, Muelle Uno – frequently shadowed by huge ferries, sometimes 4 at the same time – is buzzing with life, as malaguenios love to hang out at one of the many restaurants and bars with views to the boats moored there. Its yellow-sand beaches and long promenade with palm trees, sprinkled with a chiringuito in all the right spots, are constantly attracting a mix of sporty or chilling-out crowd. The old center – beautifully renovated- is a pleasure to walk, shop, visit one of the Museums – Malaga has 30 all together! – or Picasso’s own birth house and listen to local bands playing on the outdoor terraces or in the streets. Food is fabulous – with many options to choose from – the weather is practically urging you to stay outdoors and the cheerful noise from the rooftop terraces of the nearby hotels invite you to come up and have dinner with a breathtaking city and sea view.

Málaga’s colorful market, the Mercado de Atarazanas, is one of the most appealing in all Andalucía. The stalls sell fresh fish, meat, spices, deli items, fruit and vegetables, and it is common for shoppers to have a break at one of the food places located inside, for fresh oysters and cava. The city is wonderfully rich in architecture with a mix of styles – as it was founded by Phoenicians, then got under the hegemony of Carthagina, followed by the rule of Roman Empire, by the Islamic empire to finally be regained by the Crown of Castille in 1487. Add the luxurious exotic vegetation, the colorful parrots, the easiness of getting around both by car of by foot, the affordable bills and the always smiling relaxed people, and Malaga might allure you to make it your next permanent address. Housing options are many, from beautiful villas up the hill, with stunning views to the port and sea, to charming apartments in historic buildings, walking distance to all the action and the fun.

7 amazing places to visit on the Costa del Sol
16 Nov

7 amazing places to visit on the Costa del Sol

Spain’s sunny coast has long been Britain’s favourite holiday destination.

Known for its stunning stretches of sea, sand and guaranteed sunshine, it’s our go to location to top up our tans by the poolside. However, there is more to Spain’s southern coast than simply beach bars and cheap beer. So, before you pass it off as a one trick pony, read on and discover what else Spain’s Costa del Sol has to offer.

1. Malaga

Sadly, most people will only know Malaga for its airport, bypassing it to head further along the coast, but it’s true to say that they’re well and truly missing out. Malaga is a fantastic coastal city; oozing with Andalusian charm, it’s incredibly compact, with all the main attractions just a short stroll away from the seaside. Highlights include its Roman amphitheatre, the imposing Alcazaba and The Picasso Museum that pays homage to the city’s most famous resident.

source: Skyscanner.net

Read full article here: https://www.skyscanner.net/news/7-amazing-places-visit-costa-del-sol